Pierogi


Anyway, these are my Mom’s revered Pierogi.  What are pierogi?  They are basically the Polish version of a filled dumpling.  When served by my family they are always smothered in butter, crispy-fried bacon and sautéed onions.  They are amazing and always a treat, usually only reserved for holidays.

If you are a member of my family you know when these appear on the buffet line you better get as many as you want the first time around because there will be none left.  None.  They are scooped up in minutes and often another year must go by before anyone will be willing to make them again.

As a second generation Polish-American I felt it was finally time to learn the rigors of pierogi making.  Up until now I just enjoyed eating them and really didn’t care much about making them myself. It’s funny as the years creep up on me how traditions of family which transcended generations start to play an important role in my life. 

As my mother’s only daughter I feel it is my duty to continue pierogi making just as I used to watch my grandmother and my mother make the pierogi every holiday….mostly arguing about how much flour to use.  Somehow they always worked it out, but there were some very tense moments.

Learning this art provides a continuity of tradition my family and close relatives have enjoyed my whole life. 

The commercial versions of pierogi are sad replicas of homemade pierogi.  However, making pierogi is not for the silly people.  It is hard work and a full day’s project, unless you only make one small batch (you’ll be sorry you did).  Make a lot, they freeze well.

Again, making pierogi for me was a commitment to the past while looking to the future.  As our lives have all changed, making pierogi has remained the same.  That’s a good thing these days as time seems to be slipping away at record speed. 

I took the best pictures I possibly could.  My mother is not used to someone snapping photos at every step of cooking.  I didn’t even bother with auxiliary lighting, I think she would have had a few heart palpitations if I did.  At one point I told her to stop working while I adjusted the white balance on my camera.  Ummm, yeah, that didn’t happen.  At all.

And since we are pierogi-ing it up, I am reminded of a joke…”There was a man lying upstairs in his bed, very close to death.  He could smell the aroma coming from the downstairs kitchen where his wife was cooking pierogi.  He couldn’t believe after 50 years of marriage she still loved him so much she would be making pierogi for what was most likely his final meal.  He somehow got out of bed and crawled down the stairs to the kitchen.  As he reached for the platter on the table filled with the freshly made pierogi, his wife slapped his hands away and said, ‘Hey, get away, those are for your funeral.’

So here it is, pierogi….Mom’s way…

While there are many fillings for pierogi, our favorite is a potato-cheese-onion mixture.  It must be made the day before as it has to be very, very cold.  No exceptions.  The amount of pierogi you are going to make depends on how much filling you make.  We made about 70 pierogi and still had some filling left over.  For this many pierogi, peel and quarter 6 pounds of potatoes and bring to a boil.  While the potatoes are cooking grate approximately 3/4 cups extra-sharp cheddar cheese (do not substitute) and sauté one large, chopped onion.  When the potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork, drain and quickly return to the pot over the heat to remove any remaining water.  Begin mashing with a potato masher, adding sautéed onion and cheese.  Incorporate well and mash the potato mixture down hard until flattened.  Let cool and place in the refrigerator overnight.

Each batch of dough makes about 22-23 pierogi, depending on the size of your cutter.  I used a 3-1/4″ round cookie cutter.  This larger size makes the pierogi easier to fill, especially for a first timer.  You can not double or triple this dough recipe.  It doesn’t come out right.  We made three separate batches.

In a medium sized bowl, measure 2-1/2 cups unbleached, all-purpose flour using the scoop and sweep method  and sprinkle 1 teaspoon table salt on top.  Make a well adding 1 egg and 3 Tablespoons regular sour cream.

With two knives, incorporate the egg and sour cream into the flour.

Slowly add in approximately 3/4 cup lukewarm water.  Add only a small amount at a time as you continue to cut the egg into the flour.  My Mom is very particular and meticulous about this step. She goes slowly and makes sure every bit of flour is incorporated with the wet ingredients, so take your time here.

Once all the ingredients have been mixed, the dough will not be very smooth and possibly quite sticky.  Use your hands to bring it together into a ball.

Here is what it should look like once you bring the dough together.

Let the dough stand covered with an inverted bowl for approximately 1/2 hour before using.  Do not question this step, just do it, it’s tradition.

Once you have made all your dough batches take either all, or a portion of the dough, and roll it out until it is 1/16″ thick.  Using flour will help you keep the dough from sticking to the rolling pin and rolling surface.  Your available work surface will obviously dictate how much you can roll out at any one time.  Thickness of the dough is very important to good pierogi.  Cut out circles as close to the dough edge as possible and place them on a clean dish towel, placing them flat, just as you cut them out of the dough.  In other words, do not flip them over.  Leftover dough scraps after cutter can be put together into a ball and placed under a bowl to use at the end.

Keep the circles covered as they can dry out easily. 

Remove only some of the filling from the large bowl in the refrigerator so that you can keep it cold.  Place about 2 Tablespoons of filling into the dough circle.  Do this by picking up each circle and flipping it over into your hand.  The edge on this side is better to seal.  Place filling inside.  The dough stretches well as you press the filling in with a spoon.  Add more filling if necessary.  Bring the dough together and crimp the edges with your fingers.  Be aware that if you have any filling on your fingers or on the edges of the dough, where you are trying to seal the edges, the dough will not close.  Also be mindful not to make any small holes in the dough or leave any edges unsealed as they will come apart during cooking.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Once water is boiling, place twelve pierogi at a time in the water.  When they float to the top, give them about one more minute and remove them from the water using a slotted spoon so the water can drain off.  It is common to lose a few at this point that have not been sealed properly (early snacks).  If it is happening a lot, reseal your other pierogi before dropping them into the water.

Take them directly from the water and place them into a frying pan with a gob of melted butter over low heat.  Here you are basically just coating them well with butter so they do not stick to each other.  At this point you can cool them and freeze them in Ziplock bags if you like.

If you are going to serve them, I like to line them up like soldiers in a 9 x 13 pan.

In a large frying pan, fry one pound of bacon until crispy, remove leaving some of the fat to sauté one large, chopped, yellow onion.  When the onion is done add the crispy bacon back to the pan and mix together.

Sprinkle the bacon-onion mixture over your pierogi and serve warm.  I promise these are the best, darned things next to candy.  Just unreal. 

If you need to rewarm them.  Place a dozen at a time in a large frying pan over low heat and cover.  You are basically steaming them but it’s okay to make them a little crispy too.

Here they are with my Mom’s amazing sauerkraut in the background.  Yum.

Making these are truly a labor of love and so worth it.

Mom’s Revered Pierogi

For the filling:
6 pounds russet potatoes, peeled and quartered
1 large yellow onion, chopped
3/4 cup extra-sharp cheddar, grated (do not substitute)

This amount of filling filled approximately 70 pierogi with some left over.  Adjust amounts depending on how many batches of dough you make.

For the dough:
2-1/2 cups unbleached, all-purpose flour (measure using the scoop and sweep method)
1 teaspoon salt
1 large egg
3 Tablespoons regular sour cream
3/4 cup lukewarm water

Do not double this recipe. Each batch of dough makes about 22-23 pierogi if using a 3-1/4″ cutter.

While there are many fillings for pierogi, our favorite is a potato-cheese-onion mixture.  It must be made the day before as it has to be very, very cold.  No exceptions.  Depending on how many pierogi you are going to make depends on how much filling to make.  We made about 70 pierogi and still had some filling left over.  For this many pierogi, peel and quarter 6 pounds of potatoes and bring to a boil.  While the potatoes are cooking grate approximately 3/4 cups extra-sharp cheddar cheese (do not substitute) and sauté one large, chopped onion.  When the potatoes can be easily pierced with a fork, drain and quickly return to the pot over the heat to remove any remaining water.  Begin mashing with a potato masher, adding sautéed onion and cheese.  Incorporate well and mash the potato mixture down hard until flattened.  Let cool and place in the refrigerator overnight.

Each batch of dough makes about 22-23 pierogi, depending on the size of your cutter.  I used a 3-1/4″ round cookie cutter.  This larger size makes the pierogi easier to fill, especially for a first timer.  You can not double or triple this dough recipe.  It doesn’t come out right.  We made three separate batches.

In a medium sized bowl, measure 2-1/2 cups unbleached, all-purpose flour using the scoop and sweep method  and sprinkle 1 teaspoon table salt on top.  Make a well adding 1 egg and 3 Tablespoons regular sour cream.

With two knives, incorporate the egg and sour cream into the flour.  Slowly add in approximately 3/4 cup lukewarm water.  Add only a small amount at a time as you continue to cut the egg into the flour.  My Mom is very particular and meticulous about this step. She goes slowly and makes sure every bit of flour is incorporated with the wet ingredients, so take your time here.  Once all the ingredients have been mixed, the dough will not be very smooth and possibly quite sticky.  Use your hands to bring it together into a ball.  Let the dough stand covered with an inverted bowl for approximately 1/2 hour before using.  Do not question this step, just do it, it’s tradition.

Once you have made all your dough batches take either all, or a portion of the dough, and roll it out until it is 1/16″ thick.  Using flour will help you keep the dough from sticking to the rolling pin and rolling surface.  Your available work surface will obviously dictate how much you can roll out at any one time.  Thickness of the dough is very important to good pierogi.  Cut out circles as close to the dough edge as possible and place them on a clean dish towel, placing them flat, just as you cut them out of the dough.  In other words, do not flip them over.  Keep the circles covered as they can dry out easily. 

Leftover dough scraps after cutter can be put together into a ball and placed under a bowl to use at the end.

Remove only some of the filling from the large bowl in the refrigerator so that you can keep it cold.  Place about 2 Tablespoons of filling into the dough circle.  Do this by picking up each circle and flipping it over into your hand.  The edge on this side is better to seal.  Place filling inside.  The dough stretches well as you press the filling in with a spoon.  Add more filling if necessary.  Bring the dough together and crimp the edges with your fingers.  Be aware that if you have any filling on your fingers or on the edges of the dough, where you are trying to seal the edges, the dough will not close.  Also be mindful not to make any small holes in the dough or leave any edges unsealed as they will come apart during cooking.

Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Once water is boiling, place twelve pierogi at a time in the water.  When they float to the top, give them about one more minute and remove them from the water using a slotted spoon so the water can drain off.  It is common to lose a few at this point that have not been sealed properly (early snacks).  If it is happening a lot, reseal your other pierogi before dropping them into the water.

Take them directly from the water and place them into a frying pan with a gob of melted butter over low heat.  Here you are basically just coating them well with butter so they do not stick to each other.  At this point you can cool them and freeze them in Ziplock bags if you like.

If you are going to serve them, I like to line them up like soldiers in a 9 x 13 pan.

In a large frying pan, fry one pound of bacon until crispy, remove leaving some of the fat to sauté one large, chopped, yellow onion.  When the onion is done add the crispy bacon back to the pan and mix together.

Sprinkle the bacon-onion mixture over your pierogi and serve warm.  I promise these are the best, darned things next to candy.  Just unreal. 

If you need to rewarm them.  Place a dozen at a time in a large frying pan over low heat and cover.  You are basically steaming them but it’s okay to make them a little crispy too.

One Year Ago:  If You Don’t Like Blood, Leave Now

Post a Comment

86 Comments

  1. Paula 1

    I think I swooned when I read this. I actually read it twice because my eyes kept glazing over when I saw those photos … especially the one of the little pierogies lined up like soldiers. As if that wasn’t enough to get the drool glands pumping, seeing that magnificent bacon did the trick. I LOVE PIEROGI! Oh does this post take me back! I truly, truly love them and haven’t had them in ages. Oh, oh, oh these are sooo good at Polish weddings. Yours are amazing, and what a wonderful story they tell regarding your family. Love the joke. Love the pierogi. Yum, yum, yum!

  2. Paula 2

    I’m back … meant to say that I love the sauerkraut, too. Will we get that recipe, too? :-)

  3. Hilary 3

    Hi Cathy .. great that you’ll be carrying on a truly traditional Polish dish and it was good to see your very specific instructions .. should make it easy for us all.

    I expect your mother enjoyed the whole process of cooking with you – not sure which of the boys will take it up???

    All the best – Hilary Melton-Butcher
    Positive Letters Inspirational Stories

  4. This sounds very much like our family lefse making traditions. Some things just have to be made a certain way..and no questioning this!

    The pierogis sound delicious ( even though I hate potatoes)and the traditions behind the tasty things seem to be very sensible. What a true blessing for you to be able to document with photos and blog post a very important and delicious part of your family traditions.

  5. I don’t know if I’m up for making these. My husband is Polish American and I know if I tried to make these he’d say thats not how my mom and grandmother used to make them. Or he’d say they don’t taste the same. Maybe I’d get an A for effort though.
    Thanks to you and your mom for showing us how its done, I might get brave during the holidays.

  6. Laura 6

    I should learn by now never to come here unless I’ve eaten breakfast already.
    Yum.

  7. Mom24 7

    These look wonderful, but intimidating! How about the sauerkraut recipe? Pretty please?

  8. Julia 8

    I love peroigis! I just made nudies last night, and have some extra dough — I bet the kale/ricotta would be a great filling! Do you think it’s sacrilege?

  9. Thanks for sharing this Cathy and Cathy’s Mom!
    I will definitely have to try these.

  10. I have always wanted to make my own perogi. Thanks for this. Loved the joke.

  11. Yum…

    I think it’s so awesome that you are able to carry on this family tradition. I wish my family had something like that. Such a great story.

  12. Do you think your mom will come play at my house?

  13. Julie 13

    They look amazing! How does mom make her sauerkraut??

  14. Marlene 14

    Oh my friggin Lord…I think I just died and went to heaven.

  15. Wow, no wonder you spent so much time in the kitchen. Your pierogi are mouth watering. And I would love to try some of your mom’s sauerkraut. I love wonderful traditions like this.

  16. Melynda 16

    What a great day you had working together, and the Pierogi look great. Yes I have tried the commercial variety and thought, who would eat this. But these are definitely a must try.

  17. Candy 17

    Wow. Amazing! My husband loves them to death, but that looks like a lot of work. I’d have to quit my day job.

  18. Laurie 18

    I love pierogi!!! I wrote a story about families who celebrated Wigilia every Christmas Eve with pierogis and have been meaning to make them ever since. Your recipe looks wonderful.

  19. God Bless You for going through all of this! I don’t have the guts! I do buy fresh pierogi at a polish deli a few towns over but I am sure they don’t compare to these mouth watering beauties! I am so drooling! I am not Polish but my husband is. I was not fortunate enough to have met his mother, but when she was alive she and her sisters along with their mother used to make fresh Kielbasa in the basement of their home. Hubs has fond memories of this, but I don’t know that anyone in the family ever continued the tradition. Very Noble of you! I commend your effort and sense of tradition and family! Wish I was having those pierogi right now!

  20. Marjie 20

    You can bring some to my house if you like.

  21. Extraordinary post! Can I come to your house on Christmas Eve? I’ll bring the Cabbage Soup :)
    Cheers!

  22. Greg 22

    Cathy,

    I once had a stellar pierogi dough recipe, but I can’t find it. Mama’s might just do the trick!

    Greg

  23. Ginny 23

    Delicious! They look so good!

  24. dawn 24

    Oh how I love pierogi, I mean good pierogi cannot be found anywhere but home. I have had these at Polish weddings and they are fantastic. I really want to try making them.

  25. Noble Pig 25

    Yes, the sauerkraut recipe will be forth coming as well.

  26. Noble Pig 26

    I think the filling is up to interpretation and can be anything you like.  I say try it.

  27. Noble Pig 27

    Greg, this recipe works really well. My Mom has found that the recipes using larger amounts of flour and milk just don’t come together well. The key is the 2 cups to 2-1/2 cups of flour and not doubling the recipe. I think pierogi also weighs on your skills of rolling out a nice thin dough as well.

  28. Lynda 28

    What a wonderful recipe and tradition and it’s great that you are going to carry it on! I have not eaten pierogi before, but now want to try making them, as my grandmother was polish and her family imigrated here in the late 1890’s. I would imagine they made these, but growing up, I only saw my grandmother about once a year,so, I’m sure some traditions have been lost. I do know she made the sauerkraut, though.Thanks for posting these delicious recipes and a wonderful story. Oh yea, thanks for the funny joke too, Cathy!

  29. Lisa Sipple 29

    I love that you used a dishtowel with the colors of the Polish flag. Brilliant.

  30. Bob 30

    oh… oh my. Those look so unbelievably good. I want them right now! I’ve never had homemade ones before, only store bought.

  31. These just look amazing, and I’m so impressed you made them from scratch! I love them…but have not ventured beyond TJs own brand (which, btw, are pretty good).

  32. elra 32

    First, your fragrant lime peanut noodle looks delicious.
    Second, I’m bookmarking this and will definitely make it. Thanks you for sharing you family recipe with us.

  33. Will you return to the 38 thing in the next post??? Let’s just all say that anything this traditional and homemade is so nice to see. We’d never be able to pull this off without some true dedication and commitment to the pierogi. ha!

  34. Kimberly Ostrowski 35

    yes Cathy, my mouth is now watering. Can we consider my bday a holiday so your my will make them for me. :)

  35. Chuck 36

    Will you do Gulumpkis next please???

  36. grace 37

    what a process! i’d say such a toiling task wouldn’t be worth it for such a little nosh, but who am i kidding? deeeelicious!

  37. Beautiful. I typically shy away from recipes with lengthy instructions, but your post gives me confidence that the effort is absolutely worth it! Will report back with results!

  38. leslie 39

    Ohh Cathy.
    I love love love pierogis.I am sad to say I settle for the frozen variety, because I have never thought to make them myself.
    My mom served these up to us all the time when we were young!
    I will be making these soon. Thanks for sharing your moms recipe

  39. Maria in Oregon 40

    Wow! Those look yummy! Similar to Russian piroshki, only my family uses a meat filling. Cooked ground beef, sauteed onions, finly chopped hard boiled eggs, and lots of dill. The dough has yeast in it, and I use half butter and half lard. My mom also makes vegetarian ones for my dad, filled with mushrooms, onions and cabbage. She bakes hers, but there was a Russian deli in San Francisco that sold deep fried ones that were to die for!

  40. Katrina 41

    I’ve never had perogi’s before and while I don’t care for onions (Okay, I loathe them), everything else looks yummy. Hello, bacon! 😉

  41. Lisa 42

    Thank you for sharing this recipe! it is a wonderful story and also an education. My Mother-in-Law was Polish but I don’t remember her ever making Pierogi. She did make Galumpki,stuffed cabbage rolls, though and that is what my husband asks for. I love your reference to the battle over the amount of flour. It sounds like my aunts arguing over the recipe for the dumplings in my family’s Chicken and Dumplings. I do believe our food traditions are an important thread that binds us to the future as well as the past. Thanks again for sharing your family’s traditions with your readers.

  42. dawn 43

    sweet charlotte Cath! Man oh man! you are evil today with all these food porn pics.
    I haven’t the patience for homemade pastas & periogi’s, but have it for pastries–go figure.
    But man oh man these look so good. What a treat!

  43. You have no idea how much I love delicious home made perogies. I am savouring every single photo and wishing I had some with sour cream, bacon and onions.

  44. We used to have perogies all the time growing up and I hated them!! But, they were never homemade & I must admit, I’d kind of like to try these :)

  45. This is quite a process but it looks to be so worth all of the effort. It’s terrific that you are carrying on this wonderful family recipe! Delicious!

  46. Liz C. 47

    Oh. My. Gawd. What a wonderful story (and joke) to go along with a treasured family recipe!!! Being the Potato-Ho that I am, I will be trying these very soon. However, I’m guessing that it’s going to take a few trying times to get it right.

    So, do you have a phone number to go with this recipe? You know. So I can call you when I screw it up… to find out where I screwed it up, LOL!

  47. Kim 48

    My grandmother made these for holidays filled with peaches (yummy) and also cheese, she swore by farmers cheese. Sadly, she never got around to showing the grandchildren her methods. I made them once with my aunt but they weren’t as good. You are right it is an all day thing and it also helps to have at least 2-3 people working on them.

  48. Biz 49

    Wow, that’s a long process but totally worth it!

    Um, the finished products looks AMAZING!

  49. Wow that is a healthy and wonderful dish!
    I have to try this. Sounds delicious.

  50. LilSis 51

    Oh my goodness! Those look amazing! Even more special since it’s a family recipe.

  51. Brian 52

    You know, I don’t live that far away and it looks like you made way too many for just your family to eat:)

  52. Lisa 53

    Just discovered this website and what a great recipe to have found as my first one! I LOVE pierogi! My grandmother used to make them and several years ago three of us had an assembly line going all day making huge amounts of them. Our favorite fillings are the potato cheese and prune. I am book marking this site and saving the recipe to make for Christmas. Thank you so much!

  53. These look absolutely mouth-watering! Yum with the bacon!

  54. I’m glad I reached your post after dinner, but still I feel like reaching for a couple. They look decadent and conforting!

  55. These pierogi sound amazing made from scratch, especially good fried with bacon!

  56. Caz 57

    Awww, this brings back memories of eating homemade ones in a part-Slovenian household! Mmm! IIRC, cottage cheese ones are good too. And when I was in a Ukranian restaurant in Manhattan once, there were gourmet and seasonal pierogies that were shockingly good. (Sweet potatoes? Who knew?)

    My only problem now is that I was recently diagnosed with gluten intolerance. I wonder what would happen if I substituted gluten-free flour? Those photos just made me far too nostalgic (and hungry!)

  57. Amy V. 58

    Love this timely post…in a week, my family is gathering for my grandpa’s 85th birthday. We will spend all day Friday preparing perogy, halupki, pagatch and other “Czech” foods that we grew up eating on special occasions! For me, it will be my first (and one of my only) opportunities to learn these from the hands that originally prepared them. My grandmother is no longer with us, but we are hoping to channel her spirit! Thanks for the post!

  58. Noble Pig 59

    Chuck- It will have to wait until my mother’s next visit…we just didn’t get around to making them.

  59. ntsc 60

    Trying to remember the resturant in Cleveland that I had beef cheek pierogi.

    One grandmother is Polish/Bohemian/other and used to make these.

  60. One of my very favorite things. Never have had the pleasure of eating homemade ones.

  61. Melynda 62

    Oh yeah, now I need to know how to make the sauerkraut. I love kraut.

  62. Lea Ann 63

    oh for pittysakes! This looks wonderful. I’m going to wait for one of our Colorado snowy days, one of those when you don’t want to leave the house and then I’m going to make these! In the meantime, does your mom want to adopt another daughter??? :-)

  63. My hubs went to Penn State and the one thing he really misses from that area are those little pockets of potato goodness!

  64. megan 65

    These look awesome. I love the recipes of my youth. Your lucky you got to make them with your mom.

  65. lo 66

    Oh, gosh — those pierogis are making my mouth water… what a great experience to learn to make these from your mom! If you don’t mind, I’ll be living vicariously… I don’t have an OUNCE of Polish blood, but pierogis are one of my favorite dishes.

  66. Wow! In my family, it’s raviolis, but similar idea. We used to live in a very Polish town so my mom learned what pierogis were…but she’d buy ’em frozen and boil them. NOWHERE as yummy as those pictures you have here!

  67. Flea 68

    Oh thank you! Thank you! My MIL makes pierogi that are to die for, but won’t pass on the recipe. Thank you! I know what I’ll be making for Christmas this year, along with the bigos and egg nog!

  68. I seriously just licked my moniter. No, really, I did. Apparently my daughter has had food on her fingers and touched the screen before me…..eew!

  69. Dagmar 70

    I laughed reading this post since we basically have a war each Christmas (or other rare occassions) as everyone tries to eat as many pierogis as possible. I was never allowed to help my mother doing them since she was too inpatient with me :-) She wanted them thin and perfect :-) So I didn’t do any until I was 30 years, with the help of my mum on the phone, and they are so worth the effort! In my family we prefer to stuff them with potatoes, quark and fried chopped onion. The name for them is Ruskie pierogi, which means Russian pierogis (but I don’t think there’s anything Russian with them). Your potato/cheddar/onion version looks great as well!

  70. Oiy! I don’t trust myself to make these on my own. So um, when are you coming to Maine? :-)~ I MUST have some.

  71. Love pierogis! Thanks for sharing the recipe and detailed instructions. So nice that you could spend this time with your mom cooking.

  72. Ambroziak 73

    sharp cheddar, bacon, and not crispy!?! that’s different to me, but good!

  73. I’ve never made pierogi, but now I really want to. One more cooking goal on the list.

  74. Jamie 75

    I have so been craving pierogis lately! Honest! Now I really have to go and make them! Delish! And your mom’s sauerkraut looks fabulous!

  75. Kristen 76

    OMG I’ve never had pierogis, but they look delicious. YUM!

  76. Jess 77

    My grandmother makes them with dry cottage cheese mixed with egg whites and salt and pepper. Incredible!

    Are perogies not common in the U.S.? Up here in Canada they’re a staple! Usually we just boil them and eat them with sour cream, but I like to fry them until they’re golden and crispy and dip them in hot sauce!

  77. I’ve had a few perogy marathons…I usually end up cursing my inital ambitiousness. 20 dozen sounds feasible until it’s 4 hours later and you’re still up to your elbows in potatoes and dough.

    I haven’t had much luck with freezing after putting butter on the perogies — they stuck together. So, I just flash freeze them. Yours look delish!

  78. will 79

    Love pierogis and these were fantastic!! Made them last night and even my picky boys aged 9 and 6 loved them. Have to say i struggled with the dough a bit and properly filling it and sealing it. Think I just need a bit mor preactice which is sue to happen soon!!!!!

  79. Your pierogis are almost exactly like ours–except the filling. But I rarely see them boiled and then cooked in butter. Yummmm…

    Our traditional filling is a basic cottage cheese filling. Add an egg and some salt and pepper. Hmmm..I think I’m going to have to make some.

    Also, our pierogies end up as squares. If you cut the rectangles out of the dough, you don’t have to work it so much. Much easier! (I do biscuits the same way). Thank you for sharing!

  80. Kevin Lewandowski 81

    Thank you so much for this recipe.My mom didn’t make combination fillings but we always had a few different fillings:potato, cabbage, dry cottage cheese, and prune(Lekvar Prune Putter)were the usuals.She also slightly browned them instead of coating with melted butter.No matter how they are filled or butter coated or browned, I have eaten two dozen at a time before.I’m going to have to save this recipe.I just found one for halushki and I’m looking for pagatch and several other unnamed foods mom used to make.

  81. melissa 82

    hi cathy, found you by accident while researching pierogis in oregon..you mentioned a town neat mcminville that sells them..who and where please ? i’d love homemade but will settle for commercial as long as they are not those horrible frozen mrs.t’s..how vile.. i have made them in the past and my favorite is the chheeeeese..have you a filling recipe for those..your blog is so cool..
    melissa szilagyi

  82. Noble Pig 83

    Hi Melissa-

    I live in McMinnville but I don’t know where to buy pierogi’s here, I just make them.  I don’t usually make the cheese filled one’s either, sorry! Thanks for dropping by.

  83. Dawn 84

    We always make our pierogi with a meat filling…I’m going to have to give this filling a try! :)

  84. I propose not to hold back until you earn enough amount of money to order goods! You should get the home loans or commercial loan and feel yourself fine

  85. LMAO Cathy, I had heard that pierogi joke, and I remember my grandmother making them too.
    I need to learn how to make the bohemian dumplings my grandmother and mother made before there is no time left:)