Deviled Egg Spread


Let me see, what do I love about these….everything.  First of all, I love deviled eggs.  They are chic, simple and yummy.  However, what I love about this spread is just that…it’s a spread. 

I mean I’d never turn down a deviled egg (of any kind) but it’s nice to have the egg on the toast.  It’s more civilized and makes it more fancy.  Your hands don’t get slimy or wet and there is something good to say about the textural differences of the creamy egg paired with the crunchy bread.

I think this recipe deconstructs the retro deviled egg hors d’oeuvre in a nice way, letting the taste of the egg really come through but keeping it simple.  Simplicity remains key when entertaining.

The other plus, if you have to take these somewhere as an appetizer, they don’t slip around and you don’t need that fancy egg dish with the holes, mine broke years ago and I never replaced it.

In a large saucepan, cover the eggs with water, add the vinegar and bring to a rapid boil.  Cover the saucepan and remove it from the heat; let stand for 15 minutes.  Drain the eggs and cool them under cold running water, shaking the pan vigorously to crack the shells.  Let the eggs cool in water.

Meanwhile, quarter the bread slices on the diagonal and arrange them in a single layer on a large cookie sheet.  Toast the bread in a 450 degree oven for about 6 minutes, until barely browned.

Shell the eggs and halve them lengthwise.  Coarsely chop half of the egg whites and transfer them to a large bowl.  Add the remaining whites and all of the yolks to a food processor along with the mayonnaise and mustard and process until smooth.

Scrape the mixture into the bowl and blend with chopped egg whites.  Season with salt and pepper.

Top the toast points with the egg spread and dust lightly with paprika. 

Arrange the toast on a platter and serve.  Alternatively, serve the egg spread in a bowl with the toast points alongside.

Deviled Egg Spread
Adapted from Food & Wine

1 dozen large eggs
2 Tablespoons white vinegar
1/2 pound sliced white sandwich bread
1 cup mayonnaise
1 Tablespoon yellow mustard
Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper
Paprika for dusting

In a large saucepan, cover the eggs with water, add the vinegar and bring to a rapid boil.  Cover the saucepan and remove it from the heat; let stand for 15 minutes.  Drain the eggs and cool them under cold running water, shaking the pan vigorously to crack the shells.  Let the eggs cool in water.

Meanwhile, quarter the bread slices on the diagonal and arrange them in a single layer on a large cookie sheet.  Toast the bread in a 450 degree oven for about 6 minutes, until barely browned.

Shell the eggs and halve them lengthwise.  Coarsely chop half of the egg whites and transfer them to a large bowl.  Add the remaining whites and all of the yolks to a food processor along with the mayonnaise and mustard and process until smooth.  Scrape the mixture into the bowl and blend with chopped egg whites.  Season with salt and pepper.

Top the toast points with the egg spread and dust lightly with paprika.  Arrange the toasts on a platter and serve.  Alternatively, serve the egg spread in a bowl with the toast points alongside.

Make Ahead: The deviled egg spread can be refrigerated overnight.

One Year Ago:  Up the Creek

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59 Comments

  1. Oh, you’ve come to the right family for this one … we are huge deviled egg lovers. My mom usually makes them and is beloved for doing so. I love the idea of this, because often I want a little crunch and a different taste to balance out the egg flavor. All the more reason to make some gluten-free bread or have a new one that folks are raving about on hand. :-)

    BTW, this reminds me of your twist on the egg salad recipes. 😉

    Thanks so much, Cathy!

    Shirley

    Reply
  2. I like the recipe a lot, make eggs by the dozen in summer, so will give this idea a try..

    BUT, those photos are PERFECT! Magazine quality

    Reply
  3. Debbie 3

    We love deviled eggs and these are another way to enjoy them. They look delicious!

    Reply
  4. Julia 4

    There’s one other advantage of this over traditional deviled eggs — sometimes the eggs are *really* hard to peel, and they look like they’ve been run over by a truck. This would make for an excellent recovery!

    Reply
  5. Hey,that is good southern food you made there! YUMMY!!!

    Reply
  6. Tasty and easy. I love it!

    Reply
  7. We’ve got 10 hens currently laying and a fridge full of eggs! I make deviled eggs on occasion and everyone here loves them, but you are right…kind of slimey and sloppy! I’m thinkin’ these might be good for Superbowl Sunday, perhaps with some toasted ciabatta? I also kick the flavor up a bit by adding Dijon mustard instead of yellow mustard and sprinkle smoked paprika with a tiny pinch of cayenne on the tops.
    A new twist on an old favorite…thanks!

    Reply
  8. *sigh* Oh how I love deviled eggs.

    I make them even a bit more devilish by adding a splash of red wine vinegar and…are you ready for this? BACON!

    Be still my heart. Seriously.

    Reply
  9. Tammy 9

    Must. Have. Now.

    Reply
  10. Lea Ann 10

    I’m with you. I never turn down a deviled egg. Love this idea.

    Reply
  11. Katrina 11

    That looks good. I like the idea of having it on toast rather than inside an egg white.

    Reply
  12. annbb 12

    My granddaddy made a mean deviled egg – they were one of my very favorite things to eat growing up. Yours look delicious too, Cathy! So does that Roadside Hamburger Quiche. That’s one I’m going to have to try!

    Reply
  13. Jen 13

    My relatives always bring deviled eggs to holidays! It would be a nice change of pace to have these instead!

    Reply
  14. dawn 14

    So awesome. I love the twist because a huge egg white shell just doesn’t have a lot of flavor. I really would rather have this.

    Reply
  15. LilSis 15

    I LOVE deviled eggs but have never used as a spread. This looks so good served on the toasts. I like how you saved some of chopped egg whites to add later.

    Reply
  16. I would agree Cathy. I love devilled eggs so why not “spread” the love around.

    Reply
  17. June 17

    Boy, you’re singing my tune on this one. Yumm

    Reply
  18. Louise 18

    Deviled Eggs take on a new life in this post Cathy. Stunning, simply gorgeous. I can almost taste them from here.

    Thank you so much for sharing…

    Reply
  19. dawn 19

    you are the appetizer queen you know? I mean seriously woman.

    Reply
  20. This looks delicious! GREAT photos!

    Reply
  21. Lisa Sipple 21

    So perfect for my Easter spread.

    Reply
  22. Bob 22

    Ok, that’s just brilliant. I want 9, no 14!

    Reply
  23. Amanda 23

    Wow, this is brilliant (yet simple!) I am going to do this as soon as I have a reason to! (In fact, I might make up a reason just to do it!)

    Reply
  24. …and another tasty addition of some Old Bay Seasoning…and I will eat it all!

    Reply
  25. grace 25

    wonderful! a deviled egg ain’t a deviled egg unless there’s paprika on top. and no pickles! this is a great idea for a spread, cathy–thanks!

    Reply
  26. It’s very true you would have a hard time balancing a deviled egg on a piece of bread!

    This would be a fun recipe to play with some of the seasonings like adding a little relish to one or bacon to another.

    Reply
  27. What a quick’n’easy crowd pleaser! Always looking for great mini-bites to use to entertain. Thanks!

    Reply
  28. elra 28

    What a fabulous idea Cathy! II don’t quite like cooked egg yolk, but so funny that I love deviled eggs. Not sure why, maybe because it’s not just a plain hard boil yolk.

    Reply
  29. Jaymie 29

    Wow, your photography and recipes are so delicious. Why is it that deviled eggs are boiled in water and vinegar?

    Reply
  30. This is perfect for the deviled egg lover in me!

    Reply
  31. Debbi 31

    This looks excellent, I will for sure give it a try. Thanks for some wonderful recipe ideas!

    Reply
  32. Noble Pig 32

    Adding vinegar to the water may help the proteins in the egg white coagulate faster if the shell happens to crack during the cooking process.

    Reply
  33. Julie 33

    When that picture loaded up I got an immediate hunger pang! Pretty sad on my part, but they look so delicious!

    Reply
  34. Anna 34

    Glad to see you are a deviled-egg purist like me – just spices, mayo and mustard. I can’t stand it when people put relish or – heaven forbid – OLIVES in deviled eggs or egg salad.

    Reply
  35. Someone once told me that deviled eggs were too retro to be cool. Of course, we could never be friends after that comment… I had brought deviled eggs to a summer bbq and she made that comment as I was unwrapping the plate.

    I like mine with pickle relish. My grammy always put scallions in hers. I love them all!

    Reply
  36. Deviled egg spread sounds excellent, and I love the paprika sprinkled on top!

    Reply
  37. This is brilliant! All the greatness of deviled eggs without the slippery, slimy part. Plus, you don’t have to worry about keeping the whites neat.

    Reply
  38. KathyB. 38

    I have also put out various crackers and cucumbers and celery to stuff with deviled egg spreads. I rarely have any left over too, so it is a popular snack food around here.

    Reply
  39. So simple yet so yummy – I’ll be trying this one (hmmmm – deviled egg spread on toast for brunch tomorrow)

    Reply
  40. Shannon 40

    I make something similar to this, but instead of putting the spread on toast I mix it with elbow pasta…deviled egg pasta salad! I always feel funny making proper deviled eggs for myself as a snack but the pasta salad feels more like a meal and is less fuss. I’ll be trying it on toast next. Thanks for the idea.

    Reply
  41. Rindy R 41

    I could literally live the rest of my life eating only these! Our family LOVES egg salad – and this looks like a great way to enjoy it!

    Reply
  42. Janine 42

    My husband could smell these!! He loves devilled eggs!!

    Reply
  43. Cassie 43

    Oh YUM!!!!!! I’ve done that with crackers but never thought to use bread.

    Reply
  44. Lena in VT 44

    I have a baby shower I’m throwing in two weeks and these will be the passed appetizers!!

    Reply
  45. Janet in Phoenix 45

    I have recently discovered your luscious blog and check in with you every day! The food and photography are fantastic and I am definitely making this for our Super Bowl party this week-end! Is there a way to print this recipe to keep for the future? I don’t see a “print” button but I’m not an ace with computers! Thanks!

    Reply
  46. Noble Pig 46

    If you click on the recipe title it takes you to a new page with a different
    URL, one where the comments can be read while looking at the recipe.  Right
    above the comments (towards the end of the recipe) is a time the recipe was
    posted with a little printing icon right next to it..  Click on the icon and
    it takes you to a more printer friendly page.

    Reply
  47. Janet in Phoenix 47

    Thanks so much, Cathy! It will be the hit of our party!

    Janet

    Reply
  48. Mary 48

    I could really grow to love this, Cathy. I’m an egg fan and these look very easy to do.

    Reply
  49. Marjie 49

    Great variation on one of my favorite things. But I require minced pickles in my deviled eggs, and skip the vinegar, since it comes with the pickles.

    Reply
  50. This reminds me of the egg myo sandwiches my mum used to make for me. Love the presentation!

    Reply
  51. Barbara 51

    Deviled egg sandwiches were my father’s very favorite lunch! The only thing I ever saw him add was bacon…once in a while.
    Great post- full of memories for me.

    Reply
  52. Pam 52

    Why haven’t I ever thought of doing this – great recipe.

    Reply
  53. Lydia 53

    Deviled egg salad! Brilliant!

    Reply
  54. Sue Denyhm 54

    My mom used to make us egg salad sandwiches for school lunches, picnics etc. (She actually still makes them for her and dad now). Her recipe is very much like yours, except that she just mashes the eggs with a fork so that it is slighty lumpy rather than using a mixmaster.

    Reply
  55. Kate 55

    I am here lusting after your wonderful dishes. This one looks right up my alley. Not too fattening with lots of protein.

    Reply
  56. Flea 56

    What? No horseradish? Girlfriend, you do NOT know what you’re missing if you haven’t tried horseradish in your deviled eggs. This looks great!

    Reply
  57. Can I come over and have this right now? Seriously, I think I just drooled. Egg, natures perfect food. Sigh.

    Reply
  58. “Around 1868, Underwood’s sons began experimenting with a new product created from ground ham blended with special seasonings. The process they dubbed “deviling,” for cooking and preparing the ham, was new. But best of all, the taste was unique. Soon thereafter, the “Underwood devil” was born.”

    Reply
  59. Debra 59

    I work for L.A. County CPS. We bring food when we are on duty, so it is in the refrigerator. I’m serving it with garlic and asiago cheese sourdough crisps.

    Reply

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